November 8, 1996

Gardening on the Web


This is an in-between time for gardening in the Midwest. Most garden crops have been harvested, the garden cleaned, spring-flowering bulbs planted, and the lawn mowed for the last time. The garden catalogs have not begun to arrive and its far too early to start seedlings for next year. This used to be the time to reflect on the last garden season and dream about the next.

Annual Flowers for Indoor Use


Annuals by definition are plants that survive just one growing season. Some annuals are actually perennials or even woody shrubs in other parts of the country but, because they are not frost tolerant, cannot survive our winters. Many gardeners try to avoid the inevitable by overwintering some of their prized annuals indoors. Some annuals overwinter easier than others. For example, many gardeners successfully overwinter their geraniums from year to year. See the September 16, 1994 issue of HHPN for instructions on the different ways to overwinter geraniums.

Live Christmas Trees


For many individuals, planting a live Christmas tree into the landscape after the holidays has a special appeal. Unfortunately, planting evergreens in winter is a difficult proposition. Our harsh, winter weather (extreme cold, rapidly fluctuating temperatures, and dry winds) is often too much for the tree to endure.

Congregating Clusters of Coccinellids


This appears to have been a very good year for ladybugs. These familiar insects, known as ladybugs, ladybirds, lady beetles or coccinellids, are among the most beloved of all insects. That is, however, until large clusters appear in unexpected places, including on or in the house. Then, like many other harmless, "outdoor" insects, they become an annoyance and a pest.

1996 Two-credit Instruction Program for CPAs


Continuing instructional courses (CIC's - 1996) for commercial pesticide applicators are listed below. Continuing education courses are approved for specific certification categories. Mailings with registration information for these programs are sent to companies or applicators who are certified in each of these categories. If you are a certified commercial pesticide applicator but do not receive registration information 3 weeks before the program, call the Entomology Department at 515-294-1101.

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