March 21, 1997

Death of Newly Planted Trees


A number of dead trees have been submitted to the Plant Disease Clinic during the past several weeks. In most cases the trees were planted within the past few years.

What causes newly planted trees to die? As you can guess, there is not one standard answer. When trying to determine the primary cause of the problem, several factors need to be given consideration. Remember that dieback does not always occur in the first year. Some of the listed stress factors contribute to poor vigor over a period of years or cause tree death several years after planting.

Basil


Basil is one of the most popular herbs grown in the world. It is native to Asia (India, Pakistan, Iran, Thailand and other countries) and can be found growing wild in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Because of its popularity, basil is often referred to as the "king of the herbs". Basil has several name derivations and beliefs associated with it.

Planting Broccoli, Cabbage, and Cauliflower


Broccoli, cabbage, and cauliflower are all members of the cabbage family. They are also referred to as cole crops. Cole crops are cool season vegetables which grow best at temperatures between 60 and 68ûF. When planted in the spring, these crops must produce good quality heads before the arrival of hot summer weather.

Growing Peas in the Home Garden


Freshly harvested, shelled, and cooked peas are a late spring treat. While the garden or English pea has been widely grown for years, gardeners may also want to plant the edible podded peas. Edible podded peas include the snow and snap peas.

Snow peas (sugar peas) are harvested when the pods are long and thin, just as the seeds begin to develop. Young pods are tender, stringless, and may be stir-fried in Chinese dishes, steamed, or cooked like snap beans. If the seeds are allowed to develop fully, they may be shelled and used like garden peas.