The lower leaves on my African violet have turned yellow and become droopy. What could be wrong?

FAQ
Question: 

The lower leaves on my African violet have turned yellow and become droopy. What could be wrong?

Answer: 

The symptoms suggest the African violet may have root rot.  Root rot symptoms initially develop on the lower leaves.  The lower leaves turn yellow and droop.  As the root rot progresses, affected leaves turn brown and become mushy.  Over time, the symptoms spread upward.  Plants may eventually die if growing conditions are poor and no corrective actions are taken. 

Root rots are usually caused by overwatering.  African violets prefer an evenly moist soil.  They don’t like wet or dry potting soils.  In wet situations, root rot fungi gradually destroy the African violet’s roots, causing the plant to decline. 

Prevention is the best defense against root rot.  Allow the soil surface to dry to the touch before watering African violets.  Also, select a light, well-drained potting mix when potting or repotting African violets. 
 

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