Hort Day Podcast

Subscribe to Hort Day Podcast feed
Updated: 14 min 58 sec ago

When to Trim Back Tree Branches

Fri, 07/13/2018 - 15:22
Two people lost their lives on July 3 rd when a large Oak tree branch fell on them as they were watching fireworks in Rock Island, Illinois. While there’s likely no way to know if the accident was preventable, it’s a tragic reminder that we should all be aware of the health of the trees in our landscape. On this horticulture day edition of Talk of Iowa , Charity Nebbe talks with Jeff Iles, professor and chair of Iowa State University's Department of Horticulture, about trees. “I think an annual inspection [of your trees] is always a good idea,” Iles said. “Whenever we have strong winds, that is a good time to reassess.” Iles cautions that trees do not always have obvious signs of damage or warning signs for possible loose limbs. Later in the show, Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture specialist, joins to answer listener questions.

Mulch Ado About Nothing

Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:11
On this horticulture day edition of Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe talks to Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, and Linda Naeve, Iowa State University Extension Specialist in Value Added Agriculture, about how you can use mulch in your garden this summer. "Mulch has a lot of good characteristics to it and good advantages in a garden," Naeve says. "Most of us think, oh I want to mulch to keep the weeds down... but it also helps conserve soil moisture." Mulch can also be used to regulate soil temperature and can reduce fruit and vegetable spoilage by keeping produce away from the soil. Different types of mulch should be used in different parts of the garden. "As far as woodchips, I probably wouldn't use those in a vegetable garden," Jauron says. "I would prefer to use things that break down more quickly like straw, grass clippings, shredded leaves, and use the wood chips around ornamentals, trees, shrubs, perennial beds, more permanent plantings."

Mulch Ado About Nothing

Fri, 06/15/2018 - 12:11
On this horticulture day edition of Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe talks to Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, and Linda Naeve, Iowa State University Extension Specialist in Value Added Agriculture, about how you can use mulch in your garden this summer. "Mulch has a lot of good characteristics to it and good advantages in a garden," Naeve says. "Most of us think, oh I want to mulch to keep the weeds down... but it also helps conserve soil moisture." Mulch can also be used to regulate soil temperature and can reduce fruit and vegetable spoilage by keeping produce away from the soil. Different types of mulch should be used in different parts of the garden. "As far as woodchips, I probably wouldn't use those in a vegetable garden," Jauron says. "I would prefer to use things that break down more quickly like straw, grass clippings, shredded leaves, and use the wood chips around ornamentals, trees, shrubs, perennial beds, more permanent plantings."

Biting Bugs Arrive With Summer

Fri, 06/08/2018 - 14:52
Along with the rich greens and beautiful blossoms of early summer come bugs — gnats, mosquitoes, ticks, and many others. During this hour of Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe chats with Iowa State University entomologist Donald Lewis about biting insects. Lewis says that the biting black flies, also known as buffalo gnats, that bothered much of Iowa in late spring are thankfully gone, as their lifespan is only three weeks. Tick populations appear to be about average this year. The mosquito population level is lower than usual, but we may still see a surge in mosquitos as the summer continues. "It depends on the weather to come," Lewis says. Later in the hour, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist Richard Jauron joins the conversation and answers listener questions.

Biting Bugs Arrive With Summer

Fri, 06/08/2018 - 14:52
Along with the rich greens and beautiful blossoms of early summer come bugs — gnats, mosquitoes, ticks, and many others. During this hour of Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe chats with Iowa State University entomologist Donald Lewis about biting insects. Lewis says that the biting black flies, also known as buffalo gnats, that bothered much of Iowa in late spring are thankfully gone, as their lifespan is only three weeks. Tick populations appear to be about average this year. The mosquito population level is lower than usual, but we may still see a surge in mosquitos as the summer continues. "It depends on the weather to come," Lewis says. Later in the hour, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist Richard Jauron joins the conversation and answers listener questions.

Strawberry Beds, Patches, and Harvests

Fri, 06/01/2018 - 12:35
Ripe strawberries right out of the garden are one of the joys of summer. It's important to know how to select strawberry varieties, harvest the fruit, and even—after a few good harvests—renovate an old strawberry patch. On this episode of Talk of Iowa, Denny Schrock, State Master Gardener Coordinator, has some suggestions for growing the sweetest fruit. " If you’re doing the June bearing variety, you want to plant those 18 to 24 inches apart," Schrock says. " If you have good Iowa loam, you should have a good crop of strawberries." But it pays to wait. According to Schrock, strawberries need time to become established. " The first season is the establishment season," Schrock says. "Typically, by your second year of growing you’re going to have a good full crop." But strawberries can't grow indefinitely. Over time, fungus and insects can wreak havoc on a strawberry patch. Gardeners can revitalize the soil with techniques like solarization, for instance. Often, however, going back to

Strawberry Beds, Patches, and Harvests

Fri, 06/01/2018 - 12:35
Ripe strawberries right out of the garden are one of the joys of summer. It's important to know how to select strawberry varieties, harvest the fruit, and even—after a few good harvests—renovate an old strawberry patch. On this episode of Talk of Iowa, Denny Schrock, State Master Gardener Coordinator, has some suggestions for growing the sweetest fruit. " If you’re doing the June bearing variety, you want to plant those 18 to 24 inches apart," Schrock says. " If you have good Iowa loam, you should have a good crop of strawberries." But it pays to wait. According to Schrock, strawberries need time to become established. " The first season is the establishment season," Schrock says. "Typically, by your second year of growing you’re going to have a good full crop." But strawberries can't grow indefinitely. Over time, fungus and insects can wreak havoc on a strawberry patch. Gardeners can revitalize the soil with techniques like solarization, for instance. Often, however, going back to

To Grow Healthy Rhubarb, Bet on Sun, Soil, and Time

Fri, 05/25/2018 - 13:32
Rhubarb is one of the first flavors of spring. It's delicious in desserts and, some would argue, out of hand. On this Talk of Iowa , we share tips for growing rhubarb. Linda Naeve, ISU Extension Specialist in Value Added Agriculture, says growing rhubarb can be a breeze. "The right site is pretty easy - full sun, well-drained. Simple," Naeve says. But that doesn't mean harvest should be careless. In fact, Naeve suggests waiting a few years - two or three - before harvesting to give the plant time to get established. After the fourth year, it's safe to harvest, but Naeve suggests not harvesting after June. It's not a question of flavor, but a matter of plant health. "The more you harvest off of it, the weaker the plant is going to be," Naeve warns. Harvesting into the summer one year, Naeve says, could lead to spindly stalks the next. Richard Jauron, ISU Extension Horticulture Specialist, and Mark Vitosh, Forester with the Department of Natural Resources, join the conversation to answer

To Grow Healthy Rhubarb, Bet on Sun, Soil, and Time

Fri, 05/25/2018 - 13:32
Rhubarb is one of the first flavors of spring. It's delicious in desserts and, some would argue, out of hand. On this Talk of Iowa , we share tips for growing rhubarb. Linda Naeve, ISU Extension Specialist in Value Added Agriculture, says growing rhubarb can be a breeze. "The right site is pretty easy - full sun, well-drained. Simple," Naeve says. But that doesn't mean harvest should be careless. In fact, Naeve suggests waiting a few years - two or three - before harvesting to give the plant time to get established. After the fourth year, it's safe to harvest, but Naeve suggests not harvesting after June. It's not a question of flavor, but a matter of plant health. "The more you harvest off of it, the weaker the plant is going to be," Naeve warns. Harvesting into the summer one year, Naeve says, could lead to spindly stalks the next. Richard Jauron, ISU Extension Horticulture Specialist, and Mark Vitosh, Forester with the Department of Natural Resources, join the conversation to answer

Growing Spectacular Peonies

Fri, 05/18/2018 - 11:44
Every spring they burst forth, usually in late May or early June. You see them on farmsteads and in city landscapes. They're spectacular. They smell amazing. They don't last long. They're peonies. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe chats with Cindy Haynes, associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, about how best to care for peonies. Haynes warns peony gardeners about common problems. They may be planted too deeply, or be growing in too much shade, and high-nitrogen fertilizers may prevent blooming entirely. But ants collecting peony nectar, Haynes says, are not cause for concern. “The ants farm the peonies for the nectar," Haynes says. “They’re taking advantage of the situation, because everyone likes a sweet treat every once in a while.” Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, joins the conversation as the Hort Day gang answer questions from callers.

Growing Spectacular Peonies

Fri, 05/18/2018 - 11:44
Every spring they burst forth, usually in late May or early June. You see them on farmsteads and in city landscapes. They're spectacular. They smell amazing. They don't last long. They're peonies. During this hour of Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe chats with Cindy Haynes, associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, about how best to care for peonies. Haynes warns peony gardeners about common problems. They may be planted too deeply, or be growing in too much shade, and high-nitrogen fertilizers may prevent blooming entirely. But ants collecting peony nectar, Haynes says, are not cause for concern. “The ants farm the peonies for the nectar," Haynes says. “They’re taking advantage of the situation, because everyone likes a sweet treat every once in a while.” Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, joins the conversation as the Hort Day gang answer questions from callers.

Public Gardens are Gems in Plain Sight

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 12:30
It's National Public Gardens Day, a wonderful opportunity to visit and celebrate the many public gardens in Iowa. Public parks like the Dubuque Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, Reiman Gardens in Ames, and the Bickelhaupt Arboretum in Clinton are just some of many across the state. Assistant Director of Reiman Gardens Aaron Steil describes what sets these public gems apart. “Public gardens are kind of an umbrella term for all the arboreta, botanical gardens, just really any space that is both open to the public but also has some kind of programming behind it," Steil says. “These are places that not only have beautiful spaces but also have some kind of mission.” On this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe and Steil also talk with Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, and answer questions from callers.

Public Gardens are Gems in Plain Sight

Fri, 05/11/2018 - 12:30
It's National Public Gardens Day, a wonderful opportunity to visit and celebrate the many public gardens in Iowa. Public parks like the Dubuque Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, Reiman Gardens in Ames, and the Bickelhaupt Arboretum in Clinton are just some of many across the state. Assistant Director of Reiman Gardens Aaron Steil describes what sets these public gems apart. “Public gardens are kind of an umbrella term for all the arboreta, botanical gardens, just really any space that is both open to the public but also has some kind of programming behind it," Steil says. “These are places that not only have beautiful spaces but also have some kind of mission.” On this Talk of Iowa, Charity Nebbe and Steil also talk with Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, and answer questions from callers.

Allow Vine Crops to Spread on Trellises and Mounds

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 12:08
Some crops take a little more room to grow than others. Vine crops, like cucumbers, squashes, and melons, love to spread as they grow. On this Talk of Iowa , Charity Nebbe talks with Ajay Nair, associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, about growing vine crops. Nair recommends mounds for vine crops that spread on the ground, and he says it helps with aeration. "For cucumbers, you should try to do the trellising," Nair says. He also has recommendations for selecting pickling cultivars. "In the case of pickling cucumbers, the smaller ones are the ones that fetch a higher price." Later in the hour, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist Richard Jauron and Donald Lewis, Iowa State University professor and Extension entomologist, also join the conversation and answer questions.

Allow Vine Crops to Spread on Trellises and Mounds

Fri, 05/04/2018 - 12:08
Some crops take a little more room to grow than others. Vine crops, like cucumbers, squashes, and melons, love to spread as they grow. On this Talk of Iowa , Charity Nebbe talks with Ajay Nair, associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, about growing vine crops. Nair recommends mounds for vine crops that spread on the ground, and he says it helps with aeration. "For cucumbers, you should try to do the trellising," Nair says. He also has recommendations for selecting pickling cultivars. "In the case of pickling cucumbers, the smaller ones are the ones that fetch a higher price." Later in the hour, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist Richard Jauron and Donald Lewis, Iowa State University professor and Extension entomologist, also join the conversation and answer questions.

Building Butterfly Gardens

Fri, 04/27/2018 - 15:29
A butterfly garden is easy to plant and the results are beautiful on a number of levels. From asters to nettles, from fennel to prickly ash, a butterfly garden is easier to cultivate than you might think. On this Talk of Iowa , Charity Nebbe chats with Donald Lewis, Entomologist from Iowa State University. They go beyond milkweed and monarchs to explore garden options for colorful pollinators. " Many perennial flower beds would already qualify as a butterfly garden," Lewis says. " What you really need to do to make sure you reach the pinnacle of the butterfly garden is to ensure you put in plants that caterpillars will eat." Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, joins the conversation and answers listener questions. For more information about building a butterfly garden, you can download a free guide from Iowa State University Extension .

Building Butterfly Gardens

Fri, 04/27/2018 - 15:29
A butterfly garden is easy to plant and the results are beautiful on a number of levels. From asters to nettles, from fennel to prickly ash, a butterfly garden is easier to cultivate than you might think. On this Talk of Iowa , Charity Nebbe chats with Donald Lewis, Entomologist from Iowa State University. They go beyond milkweed and monarchs to explore garden options for colorful pollinators. " Many perennial flower beds would already qualify as a butterfly garden," Lewis says. " What you really need to do to make sure you reach the pinnacle of the butterfly garden is to ensure you put in plants that caterpillars will eat." Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Specialist, joins the conversation and answers listener questions. For more information about building a butterfly garden, you can download a free guide from Iowa State University Extension .

With Green Spring Upon Us, Invasive Insects Emerge

Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:06
This is not a drill. Our long awaited spring has finally arrived. As we anticipate and enjoy the emergence of green, it's also time for the emergence of insects. On this Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe is joined by Laura Iles, Director of the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic at Iowa State University, who acts as our guide to some of Iowa's most recent invasive insects. Mark Vitosh, forester with the Department of Natural Resources, and Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension horticulture specialist, also join the conversation and answer listener questions.

With Green Spring Upon Us, Invasive Insects Emerge

Fri, 04/20/2018 - 12:06
This is not a drill. Our long awaited spring has finally arrived. As we anticipate and enjoy the emergence of green, it's also time for the emergence of insects. On this Talk of Iowa , host Charity Nebbe is joined by Laura Iles, Director of the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic at Iowa State University, who acts as our guide to some of Iowa's most recent invasive insects. Mark Vitosh, forester with the Department of Natural Resources, and Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension horticulture specialist, also join the conversation and answer listener questions.

Purple Planted Majesties for Your Garden

Mon, 04/09/2018 - 11:16
Purple foliage is striking against a landscape of green, pops against neutral-colored siding, and can add color to a garden year-round. For Cindy Haynes, associate professor of horticulture at Iowa State University, a plum tree planted her passion for the purple pigment, and her garden hasn't been the same since. "You don't want an all purple foliage garden because then nothing stands out," Haynes says. "I've tried it, I know." On this Talk of Iowa , Haynes joins Charity Nebbe for this week's horticulture day. Haynes recommends a variety of shrubs, flowering plants, and trees to add to your garden. Ninebarks, little devils, coleus, black snakeroot, royal raindrops, prairie fire, and Norway maples are just a few options to bring violets and burgundies into your life. Richard Jauron, Iowa State University Extension horticulture specialist, also joins Haynes as they answer listener questions.

Pages