Mosquito Activity Picks Up Following Rain and Warm Temperatures

Below is the summary of recent mosquito activity in Iowa from the ISU Medical Entomology Laboratory. Mosquito surveillance in Iowa has been ongoing since 1969 and provides public health officials and the general public with information about mosquito populations and the potential for those mosquitoes to transmit disease pathogens.  Trap catches mentioned in the report refer to battery-powered New Jersey Light Traps.   

 

A trip outside in the evening confirms what was found in Iowa's mosquito trapping program:  They're ba-a-a-ack!

 

This seemed to be the first real "mosquito week" of the season as floodwater mosquitoes are just n ow doing what they do best - emerging by the bucket load (pun intended). Based on trap collections in Ames, we know that populations of Aedes vexans are exploding as our samples are yielding hundreds of mosquitoes each night. This is no wonder, given all of the rainfall over the past few weeks. With prolonged rainstorms like the one on June 11, we expect to see this trend continue for the rest of June and to see floodwater mosquito species become more abundant!

 

Mosquito populations were relatively sparse up through June 5.   However, with temperatures rising into the 80s at the beginning of this week and with plentiful puddles to support mosquito larval development over the past couple of weeks, the mosquito populations exploded by the right chain of events to be here now.  See chart below.

 

Mosquito Control

 

Personal efforts and municipal mosquito control practices can alleviate mosquito annoyance.  Remove standing water sources to reduce the availability of mosquito breeding sites and use insect repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, and some oil of lemon eucalyptus and para-menthane-diol for longer-lasting protection.  Source:  Center For Disease Control and Prevention.  

 

West Nile Virus Threat

 

The flood-water mosquitoes that are very common right now do NOT transmit any viruses to people.  West Nile Virus disease threat occurs in the fall when Culex spp. and other virus vectors are in greater abundance.

 

 

Mosquito populations in Iowa for the current and previous year as of June 12, 2015 according to New Jersey light trap records. Data are shown as a weekly average of traps running.Mosquito populations in Iowa for the current and previous year as of June 12, 2015 according to New Jersey light trap records. Data are shown as a weekly average of traps running.

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